50+ Tattoo Friendly Onsen in Japan

Tattoo Friendly Onsen in Japan

A very common question from our readers is where to find tattoo friendly onsen or hot springs in Japan, including population destinations such as Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka and in Hakone and Kawaguchiko near Mt Fuji.  We have conducted extensive research to identify the onsen which will best suit people with tattoos. These onsen are also suitable for those without tattoos so check them out to find the perfect onsen option for your trip to Japan!!

Some onsen are located in urban areas and some are in off the beaten track locations.  The onsen refers to just the hot spring itself, and often the same facility may also be a ryokan (pronounced yo-kan with a silent R), which is a Japanese inn which offers accommodation and meals.  Often the onsen is stand alone and there are nearby accommodation options within walking distance.  To better understand the key onsen or hot spring terminology below is a quick overview of the main terms you need to know:

  • Onsen – A Japanese natural hot spring with bathing facilities. It can be both public and private, inside or outside. Hot spring resort towns are also called onsen which can be quite confusing.
  • Rotenburo – Outside hot spring bath. Roten means outside.
  • Ryokan – traditional Japanese Inns which include lodging and meals
  • Sento – A sento is in many respects like an onsen but it runs on heated tap water which is not from a natural hot spring.
  • Yu – meaning hot water (doesn’t distinguish between natural and regular hot water)

Check out our Japan Travel Planning Facebook Group – you are welcome to join and it is a great resource to enable you to ask questions about your upcoming trip to Japan!

Disclaimer:  This article contains affiliate links.  If you book after clicking on one of these links then we may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Contents

A Quick Introduction to Onsens and Sentos

Onsens are incredibly popular in Japan. Almost 75 percent of the country is mountainous. Japan is also located on the Pacific Ring of Fire and as a result is rated as the 3rd most geologically active country. These two facts combined means Japan has lots of volcanoes. In fact, it has about 10 percent of the world’s active volcanoes. As a result of these conditions, Japan has many hot springs (or onsen) with many of them located in volcanic belts where hot springs come from heated groundwater near the volcanoes. Japan’s Ministry of the Environment reports that Japan has over 3000 onsen areas and over 28000 thermal fountainheads.

The use of onsens in Japan is reported to date back at least 1300 years. By the 12th century bathing in hot springs had become incredibly popular due to the influence of Buddhism and the associated importance of cleansing the body. Historical records show that emperors were reported to take trips to onsens, and during wars in the 15th and 16th centuries, wounded warriors sought out onsen to heal themselves. By the 17th century the health benefits of onsen were widely recognised.

Today, onsen remain very important to the Japanese people both for their reported health benefits but also, they are refreshing to the body and spirit and a great source of stress relief.

A visit to an onsen is equally popular among overseas tourists. In a 2015 survey conducted by the Japan Tourism Agency almost 35 percent of tourists said they hoped to visit an onsen. This was behind only eating Japanese food (71 percent), shopping (61 percent), nature and scenic sightseeing (51 percent) and shopping malls (43 percent). Staying at a ryokan was at 25 percent. When overseas tourists who had already been to Japan were asked what they wanted to do on their next trip to Japan the percentage of people wanting to visit an onsen jumped to 45 percent.

For our family, Shibu Onsen near Nagano was our first onsen experience and it was a memory we will forever hold on to. Every future trip to Japan will also include one or more visits to an onsen.

Are You Allowed in an Onsen or Sento if You Have a Tattoo?

What do you do if you are one of those many people who want to visit an onsen but have a tattoo? Tattoos in Japan have historically been associated with the yakuza. For many Japanese, displaying tattoos in public places make them feel uncomfortable. As a result, many onsen have banned anyone with a tattoo from using them. A 2015 survey of 3800 ryokan showed that 56 percent of ryokan would refuse entry to people with tattoos. If you have a tattoo you may justifiably feel quite apprehensive about visiting an onsen or other public facilities and places where people may see your tattoos.

But now for the good news. The attitude towards people with tattoos is changing rapidly particularly at the government and business level. This change of attitude is being driven in large part by the importance of tourism to the economy. The number of overseas visitors to Japan is absolutely exploding. The following figures will give you some idea of the growth in tourism: 1998 – 4.1 million visitors, 2008 – 8.4 million visitors, 2014 – 13.4 million visitors, 2015 – 19.7 million visitors, 2016 – 24 million visitors. At one point, the Japanese government were hoping to achieve 20 million visitors by 2020 but they are now aiming for 40 million visitors and with upcoming events such as the Rugby World Cup in 2019 and the Summer Olympics in 2020 this goal may be achievable.

One of the ways Japanese government and businesses are hoping to maintain this rapid growth is to open up entry to attractive public facilities such as onsen. At one point it may have made some sense to ban people with tattoos from entering onsen when they were mainly focused on trying to restrict entry to the yakuza. Now however, the tattoo bans are stopping many overseas tourists from using onsens. As a result, many organisations such as the Japanese Tourism Organisation are trying to educate and encourage onsen operators on the importance of changing their practices and this is starting to have an effect.

While the 2015 Japan Tourism Agency survey showed that 56 percent of ryokans would refuse entry to people with tattoos, 30 per cent of ryokans said they wouldn’t turn someone away if they had tattoos, and another 13 percent would allow access under conditions such as having the tattoo covered up. This means that if you have a tattoo, close to half of the ryokans surveyed would allow you to use their onsens.

Introduction to the Onsens and Sentos in this Article

Throughout the rest of this article, I will be providing you with a wide range of onsens and sentos that will welcome you if you happen to have a tattoo. The suggested onsens and sentos will provide a wide range of experiences from luxury spa type experiences to minimal, no frills experiences. It’s important to remember that sentos in particular were bath houses for people that didn’t have baths in their homes, thus sentos were an important part of daily life even up until about 50 years ago. Thus, some sentos while not luxurious will give you an insight into how Japanese people lived.

Along with the suggested onsen and sento, I have also recommended ryokan as suggested accommodation when possible as onsen, sento and ryokan go together perfectly if you want to have an authentic Japanese experience. I have made accommodation recommendations using Booking.com, as they provide the option to make your accommodation booking without paying up front (unlike AirBnB) and you also can easily cancel your bookings if required. We have also suggested properties available through Hotels.com. They have a great loyalty program where for every 10 nights collected you get a night free which you can redeem any time.

I have used various sources to check that the following onsens and sentos are tattoo friendly but circumstances can and do change. I suggest that you verify that the onsen or sento is still tattoo-friendly before you go there. The easiest option is to ask a native Japanese speaker to help you with this, otherwise this terrific article on GaijinPot includes some handy Japanese phrases to check if tattoos are OK. You can also use this approach even for onsen and sento which aren’t listed in this article and you might be pleasantly surprised with the answer, particularly if your tattoos are small enough to allow you to wear a tattoo sleeve or sticking plaster. Another way to confirm that the onsen or sento is tattoo friendly is to email them. Use Google Translate to make the emailing process easier.

At the end of this article, I have included links to a number of other resources that contain additional tattoo-friendly onsen and sento information.

Onsen and Sento Etiquette in Japan
Onsen and Sento Etiquette in Japan

Tattoo Friendly Onsen in Tokyo – Asakusa/Ueno Neighbourhood

I have provided several different tattoo friendly onsen and sento for you to consider in Tokyo. As a point of interest, unlike most onsen in Japan, the hot springs under Tokyo are thought to be due to a layer of warm water (not volcanoes).

We have found several tattoo friendly onsen/sento in close proximity to each other in the Asakusa, Tokyo Sky Tree and Ueno area. Other attractions in this area of Tokyo include the Tokyo Skytree, sumo wrestling, Edo Tokyo Museum, Senso-ji Temple and the Kappabashi Dori kitchenware shopping area.  For more information about these attractions check out my article on What to Do in Tokyo.

Asakusa is arguably the most traditional neighbourhood in Tokyo and has a greater number of traditional ryokan than other areas of Tokyo. Therefore if you want a traditional Japanese experience Asakusa is the best neighbourhood area to stay.

Below is a detailed map showing the locations of each onsen or sento in green, local landmarks in orange and recommended accommodation in blue.

Daikokuyu Onsen in Asakusa, Tokyo

Daikokuyu Onsen was established in 1949 and uses water from a well that was found to have onsen properties.  This onsen is located on the northern side of Tokyo and is a 10 minute walk from the Tokyo Sky Tree.  For more information and photos of Daikokuyu Onsen check out the below review articles:

Daikokuyu Address and Contact Details

Address: 3-12-14 Yokokawa, Sumida, Tokyo

Phone:  03-3622-6698

How to get to Daikokuyu Onsen

Daikokuyu is located within a 6 to 12 min walk of multiple train stations. Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation near Daikokuyu:

Below are two recommendations for accommodation close to Daikokuyu Onsen, one a ryokan and one a hotel.

  • Ryokan Kamogawa Asakusa – This ryokan has a 4-star rating and has excellent reviews. It is located 1.6km from Daikokuyu but is only a two minute walk from Senso-Ji temple and Asakusa Subway Station is 5 minutes away. Family rooms are available.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.
  • Mid-Range Hotel – Richmond Hotel Premier Tokyo Oshiage – If you would like an option closer to Daikokuyu, Richmond Hotel Premier is a 4-star hotel near the Tokyo Skytree located 600m from Daikokuyu and has close access to public transport. It has rooms which can accommodate up to 4 people which makes it a great option for couples and smaller families. Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Jakotsuyu Sento in Asakusa, Tokyo

Jakotsuyu is a sento and is one of the most historic public bathhouses in Tokyo which has been in operation since the Edo period. It has a mural of Mount Fuji over the main bathroom.  For more information and photos of Jakotsuyu Sento check out the below review articles:

Jakotsuyu Address and Contact Details

Address:  1-11-11 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Phone: 03-3841-8645

How to get to Jakotsuyu

Jakotsuyu is a 5 minute walk from Asakusa Station and a 3 minute walk from Tawaramachi Station. Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the full range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation:

Below are two ryokan recommendations for accommodation close to Jakotsuyu Sento.

Mikokuyu Onsen in Asakusa, Tokyo

Mikokuyu Onsen was founded in 1947. It has bathhouses in the first, fourth and fifth floors of the building. You can see the Tokyo Skytree from the semi-outdoor baths. The fifth floor baths have a large oil painting of Mount Fuji on the wall.  For more information and photos of Mikokuyu Onsen check out the below review article:

御谷湯 / MIKOKUYU

A post shared by Daisuke Mita (@daisukemita) on

Mikokuyu Onsen Address and Contact Details

Address:  3-30-8 Ishiwara, Sumida, Tokyo

Phone:  03-3623-1695

How to get to Mikokuyu Onsen

Mikokuyu Onsen is located within a short walk of multiple train stations. Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation near Mikokuyu:

Below are two recommendations for accommodation close to Mikokuyu. I have provided one option which is not a ryokan due to the distance of the provided ryokan from Mikokuyu.

  • Ryokan Asakusa Shigetsu – This ryokan has a 3-star rating and is rated as fabulous on Booking.com. It is located 1.8km from Mikokuyu but is only a 2 minute walk from Senso-Ji temple and Asakusa Subway Station is 5 minutes away. They have rooms that sleep from 1 to 4 people. Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.
  • Mid-Range Hotel – Fukuwauchi – If you would like an option closer to Mikokuyu, Fukuwauchi is a 3-star hotel located 600m from Mikokuyu and has close access to public transport. It has Japanese-style rooms which can sleep from 2 to 5 people which makes it a great option for both couples and families. Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Nippori Saitoyu Sento in Asakusa, Tokyo

Nippori Saitoyu Sento has been recently renovated and provides multiple different types of sento baths.  For more information and photos of Nippori Saitoyu Sento check out the below review articles:

Nippori Saitoyu Sento Address and Contact Details

Address:  6-59-2 Higashi-Nippori, Arakawa-ku

Phone: 03-3801-4022

How to get to Nippori Saitoyu

Nippori Saitoyu is a 3 minute walk from Nippori Station.  Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation near Nippori Saitoyu:

Below is a recommendation for accommodation close to Nippori Saitoyu.

  • Hotel MyStays Nippori – This budget hotel has a 2-star rating and has good reviews on Booking.com.  It is located 250m from Nippori Saitoyu, and is only a 500m walk from Nippori Station, which can be accessed directly from Narita Airport on the Keisei Skyliner train. They have rooms that sleep from 1 to 4 people. Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Sukeroku No Yado Sadachiyo Ryoken and Onsen in Asakusa, Tokyo

Sukeroku no Yado Sadachiyo is a ryokan in a very traditional looking building. It is located within Asakusa which is at the heart of the old town of Tokyo as it retains much of the Edo period vibe. It has two large public baths. It is located within 400m of Senso-ji temple.  For more information and photos of Sukeroku No Yado Sadachiyo Ryoken and Onsen check out the below review article:

Sukeroku No Yado Sadachiyo Ryoken and Onsen Address and Contact Details

Address: 2-20-1 Asakusa,Taito-ku

Phone:  03-3842-6431

How to Get to Sukeroku No Yado Sadachiyo

Sukeroku no Yado Sadachiyo is a 6 minute walk from Asakusa Station. Click on the Google Map above and enter your starting point to see the range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation:

Sadachiyo is both an onsen and ryokan. They have both twin rooms (suitable for couples) and quadruple rooms (suitable for a family of 4). Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Fuku no Yu Sento in Asakusa, Tokyo

Fuku no Yu Sento is located to the north of Ueno Station.  While located in a more deserted area, this sento provides a huge range of bathing activities in a multi storey building.  This sento includes large scale mineral baths, cold water bath, jet tubs, showers, lay-down bath, jacuzzi and electric bath.  On the rooftop there is a cold open air bath and sauna.  For more information and photos of Fuku no Yu Sento check out the below review articles:

Fuku no Yu Sento Address and Contact Details

Address:  5-19-10 Motogō, Kawaguchi, Saitama

Phone:  48-223-3246

How to get to Fuku no Yu Sento

Fuku no Yu is located a 700m walk north of Iriya Station, which is just north of the major Ueno Station.  Click on the Google Map above and enter your starting point to see the range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Accommodation:

Below are two recommendations for accommodation close to Fuku no Yu:

For other accommodation options in the Asakusa area check out the options in the Booking.com search box below.

Booking.com

Tattoo Friendly Onsen near Kyoto

Kurama Onsen Ryokan and Onsen near Kyoto

For an authentic outdoor onsen near Kyoto which is tattoo friendly then you should definitely check out the option to visit Kurama Onsen.  If you only want to visit the onsen then it is an easy 50 minute train and bus trip from Kyoto Station, and even closer if you are staying in northern Kyoto.  Kurama Onsen is also a Ryokan so you also have the option to book in and take some additional time to make the most of your visit!

Kurama is also a great day trip from Kyoto for both adults and families.  You can start by visiting the village of Kibune and enjoy a traditional lunch before hiking the 4km long easy traditional route to Kurama Station with many attractions along the way.  From Kurama Station you can either walk or catch the free shuttle bus to Kurama Onsen to enjoy a well earned soak.

For more information and photos of Kurama Onsen check out the below review articles:

Gloomy morning soak in Kyoto

A post shared by ?? (@me__lissa__) on

Kurama Onsen Address and Contact Details

Address: 520 Kuramahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto

Phone:  75-741-2131

How to get to Kuruma Onsen

Kurama Onsen is located a 50 minute train ride from Kyoto Station to Kurama Station.  From there you can either walk or catch the regular free shuttle bus to Kurama Onsen.  Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the full range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Kurama Onsen Accommodation:

Kurama Onsen – This ryokan has a 4 star rating and has excellent reviews.  The Japanese style rooms can sleep up to 4 people.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Tattoo Friendly Onsen near Mount Fuji

Tattoo Friendly Onsen in Hakone near Mt Fuji

One of the most popular areas for visitors to Japan to seek an onsen stay is in the Mt Fuji area.  Hakone is a very popular area to stay in ryokans with onsens where you can view Mt Fuji from your onsen.  Hakone is quite a large area which includes areas such as Odawara to the east, Lake Ashi to the west and borders Gotemba to the north.

Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen in Hakone

Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen is an awesome indoor and outdoor onsen located in the heart of Hakone, and is easily accessible by public transport, and allows access by people with both small and large tattoos (check out their Instagram feed!).  For more information and photos of Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen check out the below review articles:

A stunning outdoor onsen in Tenzan Onsen

A post shared by Antonia Nicol (@fire1234ball) on

Address and Contact Details

Address:  208 Yumotochaya, Hakone, Ashigarashimo, Kanagawa

Phone:  460-86-4126

How to get to Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen

 From Tokyo Station you can catch the shinkansen to Odawara Station, and then catch the bus to Hakone-Yumoto Station.  From there you can catch the shuttle bus to go direct to Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen.

Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen Accommodation:

A real difficulty is trying to find Ryokans which will permit people with tattoos to use the public bathing areas -while many of them will accept tattooed bathers, they are unwilling to write up this fact on their websites.  Therefore the best option is to book a Ryokan with a private bath inside your room, and when you get there also enquire whether you will also be able to use the public baths.

Here are a selection of Ryokans close to Hakone-Yumoto Station which offer private in room onsens.  You can then also easily catch the shuttle bus direct to the onsen from the station or a taxi to Tenzan Tohji-kyo Onsen to experience the public baths.  Most Ryokans offer the option for breakfast and dinner to be included in your room fee so factor this in when you look at the room costs.

  • Ichinoyu Shinkan – This mid-range ryokan has a 3-star rating and is well rated on Booking.com. It is located 2.8km from Tenzan Onsan, and is a 1km walk from Hakone-Yumato Station, from which you can catch the courtesy shuttle bus.  They have rooms which sleep up to 4 people, and also a twin room with private open air bath.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.
  • Hotel Kajikaso – This more luxurious ryokan has a 3 star rating and is well rated on Booking.com. It is located a 5 minute walk from Hakone-Yumato Station, from which you can catch the courtesy shuttle bus.  They have rooms which sleep up to 4 people, and also a room with private open air bath which can sleep up to 5 people.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Hoshino Resorts Kai Hakone Ryokan and Onsen in Hakone

Kai Hakone is a hot spring ryokan in a riverside location beside the Sukomo River. It has 24 Japanese-style rooms, 6 Western-style rooms, and 2 Western-style rooms with an outdoor bath. Bath halls at Kai Hakone are semi-open and are fed by the Yumoto Hot Spring. The ryokan has a restaurant, lounge and offers a range of interesting free activities.  Tattoos which can be covered by a sticking plaster can be accommodated.  For more information and photos of Kai Hakone Onsen and Ryokan check out the below review article:

Kai Hakone Onsen and Ryokan Address and Contact Details

Address: 230 Yumotochaya, Hakonemachi, Ashigarashimo, Kanagawa

Phone:  570-073-011

How to get to Kai Hakone Onsen and Ryokan

From Tokyo – (1) Catch the Tokaido Shinkansen from JR Tokyo Station to JR Odawara Station (30 min) then catch a taxi to Kai Hakone (20 min). (2) Catch the Limited Express Romancecar from Odakyu Shinjuku Station to Odakyu Hakone-Yumoto Station then catch a taxi or the Hakone-Tozan Bus to Kai Hakone (7 min). There are also directions to get to Kai Hakone from Osaka as well as Narita and Haneda Airports on the Kai Hakone web page.

Kai Hakone Accommodation

You can book Kai Hakone through their own website, but it reverts to Japanese and is more difficult to use.  Instead we suggest that you book through Hotel.com – they are much easier to use and also offer a stay 10 nights and get 1 night free deal for regular users.

Onsens in Yamanashi near Mt Fuji

Hottarakashi Onsen

Hottarakashi Onsen is a great onsen option for those who wish to be able to view Mt Fuji from the onsen.  They offer outdoor gender separated baths with spectacular sunrise views and views of Mt Fuji.  For more information and photos of Hottarakashi Onsen check out the below review article:

夜景に温泉、富士に朝日。 至極でした。 #ほったらかし温泉

A post shared by toyoda mikihiro (@manosyoyumi) on

Hottarakashi Onsen Address and Contact Details

Address:  1669-18 Yabori, Yamanashi City, Yamanashi

Phone:  0553-23-1526

How to get to Hottarakashi Onsen

You can easily catch the train from Tokyo to Yamanashishi Station, and from there you can catch a taxi to Hottarakashi Onsen which is about a 10 minute ride.  Click on the Google Map below and enter your starting point to see the full range of options available. Make sure you’ve clicked on the train icon to see the public transport options.

Hottarakashi Onsen Accommodation

  •  A great option to stay close to the onsen is to stay at the Hottarakashi camping ground which is directly behind – you then have easy access to the early morning bathing option. You can either bring your own camping gear or hire either a camper trailer or tent and other camping equipment.  The campground also has views of Mt Fuji so is a great option.
  • Fruit Park Fujiya Hotel – This hotel has a 4-star rating and is well rated on Booking.com. It is located 2km away from Hottarakashi Onsen, and has views of Mt Fuji, and also has their own on site onsen facilities.  They have western style rooms which can sleep up to 2 people, and Japanese style rooms which can sleep up to 4 people.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Onsens in Ito near Mt Fuji

A great ‘off the beaten track’ option to both view Mt Fuji from selected locations and have an amazing seaside onsen experience is Ito, which is located on the Izu Peninsula to the south of Mt Fuji.  Ito is easily accessible by a 2 hour shinkansen trip from Tokyo.

Hoshino Resorts Kai Anjin in Ito, near Mt Fuji

Kai Anjin is a hot spring ryokan in Ito which is a coastal city. It has rooms and bath halls that look over the ocean. It has a nautical theme in recognition of William Adams (1564-1620) the first English samurai and a navigator on ships. William Adams is also the inspiration for a character called Jack Fletcher in the Young Samurai series of books that my whole family has enjoyed reading.

Kai Anjin has 32 Western-style twin rooms, 8 Western-style double rooms and 5 Western-style suites. All rooms have ocean views. The penthouse bath halls have panoramic views over the Pacific Ocean. Each bath hall has granite indoor baths, and rock-adorned outdoor baths. Kai Anjin has a restaurant, lounge and offers a range of interesting free activities. For more information see their webpage detailed below.

All Hoshino Resorts permit tattoos which can be covered by a sticking plaster.

For more information and photos of Kai Anjin check out the below review article:

Hoshino Resorts Kai Anjin Address and Contact Details

Address:  5-12 Nagisa, Ito, Shizuoka

Phone: 50-3786-1144

How to get to Kai Anjin

From Tokyo – (1) Catch the Limited Express Odoriko from JR Tokyo Station to JR Ito Station (105 min) then walk (15 min) or catch a taxi (5 min) to Kai Anjin. (2) Catch the Tokaido Shinkansen (55 min) from JR Tokyo Station to JR Atami Station, then use the Ito Line to get to JR Ito station, then walk (15 min) or catch a taxi to Kai Anjin (5 min). There are also directions to get from Osaka as well as Narita and Haneda Airports on the Kai Anjin web page.

Accommodation

You can book Kai Anjin through their own website, but it reverts to Japanese and is more difficult to use.  You can also book through Hotel.com – they offer a stay 10 nights and get one night night free deal for regular users.

Hoshino Resorts Kai Ito Ryoken and Onsen near Mt Fuji

Kai Ito is a hot spring ryokan and onsen in Izu. It has 25 Japanese-style rooms and 5 Japanese-style rooms that have outdoor baths. Both its public baths and guest room baths are fed by Ito Hot Spring which is the largest in Japan in terms of quantity of water and is also well-known for its rich mineral content. Kai Ito has a restaurant, lounge and offers a range of interesting free activities.

Kai Ito Address and Contact Details

Address:  2-21 Okahiro, Ito, Shizuoka

Phone:  50-3786-1144

How to get to Kai Ito

From Tokyo – (1) Catch the Limited Express Odoriko from JR Tokyo Station to JR Ito Station (105 min) then walk (10 min) or catch a taxi (5 min) to Kai Ito. (2) Catch the Tokaido Shinkansen (55 min) from JR Tokyo Station to JR Atami Station, then use the Ito Line to get to JR Ito station, then walk (10 min) or catch a taxi to Kai Ito (5 min). There are also directions to get from Osaka as well as Narita and Haneda Airports on the Kai Ito web page.

Kai Ito Accommodation

You can book Kai Ito through their own website, but it reverts to Japanese and is more difficult to use.  You can also book through Hotel.com – they offer a stay 10 nights and get one night night free deal for regular users.

  • Kai Ito Ryokan – This 4-star luxurious ryokan is well rated on Hotels.com. Children aged 11 years and under are not able to stay at this hotel.  They have rooms which sleep up to 7 people, including a room option with a private outdoor bath which would be suitable for people with larger tattoos.  Click here to check out the latest pricing and to make your booking.

Onsens in Atami near Mt Fuji

If you would prefer to stay closer to Mt Fuji a great option is Atami, which is located half way between Ito and Hakone.  An great advantage of Atami is that you can travel there on a single shinkansen trip from Tokyo in less than one hour.  In select locations around Atami you can also have views of Mt Fuji.  For more information about what to do in Atami check out their tourism website.

Hoshino Resorts Kai Atami Ryokan and Onsen near Mt Fuji

Kai Atami is a hot spring ryokan set at the top of the mountain overlooking the water in an inn dating back to 1849. Kai Atami has 16 Japanese-style rooms. Kai Atami Villa Del Sol is by the sea and has 7 Western-style rooms with an ocean view. The indoor bath is made from cypress and the outdoor bath has an ocean view. Baths are fed by Hashiriyu which was discovered about 1300 years ago making it one of the 3 oldest hot springs in Japan. Kai Atami has a restaurant, lounge and offers a range of interesting free activities.

Kai Atami Address and Contact Details

Address:  750-6 Izusan, Atami, Shizuoka

Phone:  570-073-011

How to get to Kai Atami

From Tokyo – Catch the Tokaido Shinkansen from JR Tokyo Station to JR Atami Station (45 min). Catch a taxi to Kai Atami (5 min) or Kai Atami Villa Del Sol (7 min). There are also directions to get from Osaka as well as Narita and Haneda Airports on the Kai Atami web page.

Kai Atami Accommodation

You can book Kai Atami through their own website, but it reverts to Japanese and is more difficult to use.  You can also book through Hotel.com – they offer a stay 10 nights and get one night night free deal for regular users.

Hoshino Resorts Risonare Atami Ryokan and Onsen near Mt Fuji

Risonare Atami Resort is located in the seaside city of Atami. Unlike most of the accommodation options suggested in this article, Risonare Atami is a modern hotel. It has 77 Western-style rooms (with ocean views) ranging from 65m2 to 120m2 in size. There is a choice of a wooden bath and a stone bath. The semi-outdoor hot spring bath has a spectacular view over Atami as it set at the top of a 170m tall mountain. Risonare Atami has a restaurant, lounge and a wide range of activities. For more information see their webpage detailed below.

Risonare Atami Resort Address and Contact Details

Address:  2-13-1 Minaguchi, Atami, Shizuoka

Phone: 570-073-055

How to get to Risonare Atami

From Tokyo – From Tokyo Station take the Tokaido Shinkansen to Atami Station (40 min), then catch the shuttle bus to Risonare Atami (20 min). There are also directions to Risonare Atami from Narita, Haneda, Chubu and Kansai Airports on their web page.

Risonare Atami Resort Accommodation

You can book Risonare Atami through their own website, but it reverts to Japanese and is more difficult to use.  You can also book through Hotel.com – they offer a stay 10 nights and get one night night free deal for regular users.

There are many more tattoo friendly onsens coming shortly!

Tattoo Friendly Onsen in Japan
Hover over the image to pin to Pinterest

Check out our Japan Travel Planning Facebook Group – you are welcome to join and it is a great resource to enable you to ask questions about your upcoming trip to Japan!

Disclaimer:  This article contains affiliate links.  If you book after clicking on one of these links then we may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

More from Tony Sutherland-Smith

Best Prepaid Data Sim Card in Japan for Tourists in 2018

A Japan travel sim card is a great option for easy and...
Read More

2 Comments

  • What a fabulous guide Tony. Ever since my wife lived in Japan for a year I was fascinated with the culture, including the onsen experience. Relaxing. I know many folks frown on tatted folks. The Yakuza Effect in some regards. Good deal to find some tattoo friendly places.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.